Chill, Third Edition

Chill Logo

My game group played a LOT of Chill. Back in the day. Now there is a kickstarter for a new edition!

First, let us fondly remember the early days of our paranormal investigation game. For the first string of missions, they were lucky to escape alive. Sometimes they even hindered the plans of monsters.

By the end of our run, years and years later, the characters were… experienced. They spoke conversational Latin to each other. They were each the top of their field, some powerful spellcasters and others incredibly gifted international people of mystery. They were loaded out with skill in kung fu, weapons, driving and piloting, dead languages, magical mysteries, all of it.

And yes, I had house ruled the hell out of it to bring in the best of other game systems. I brought in the sanity system from Call of Cthulu, some of the magic and monsters from Beyond the Supernatural, and all kinds of things from books, movies, and comics.

More than the advancement of the characters, it was the transformation of the PLAYERS that impressed me deeply. From fumbling at the bra strap of mystery to whipping its concealment off in one grand gesture, these investigators knew where and how to dig up clues. The players knew the dance moves, their characters had the numbers to back it up, and they’d sort out any haunting, infestation, or monster in a WEEKEND.

So it will come as no surprise that I am excited that a new edition of Chill is coming out. I am most interested in seeing how the game accounts for the supernatural investigation elements that did not exist in the 80s; the internet, for one. Massive reliance on smart phones and tablets. Surely there are monsters that will emerge to prey on these new vectors into  human life, soul, and sanity!

To celebrate the upcoming edition, here is a list of four possible new creatures of the Unknown to harass and despoil–and, ultimately, to be defeated by investigators. This is the sort of thing I liked to hit ‘em with. Back in the day.

  • Gossiper. Ghost of someone who died while texting or on a cell phone. A nasty spirit that attaches to an internet-enabled device and sends private messages to people, doing its best to hurt the one it is haunting. It cannot use punctuation or use the first letter of its last name. When you figure out who it is, send a text to the account of the person it was in life, and it will be able to move on. If the spirit can arrange for drama to escalate to the point where the victim is killed, the gossiper escalates to become a spite whisperer.
  • Spite Whisperer. This spirit is no longer a ghost; it feeds on the life energy of its victims and becomes an energy being disconnected from its mortal roots. It can inhabit any electric picture or visual representation and use it to whisper damning truth and lies to its victims. It prefers truth, the more devastating the better. It wears down the victim’s will through fear and psychic assault. When the victim commits suicide, the whisperer feeds on that energy. The whisperer chooses a blood relation of the victim it slew when it was a gossiper for the first victim, then jumps to the first person to see the suicide victim’s last media, the final image that pushed him or her over the edge. That is how it moves from then on. If it fails to kill its victim in 14 days, it animates a statue or other physical object with a face of some kind and goes for the physical kill. If that fails, then the spite whisperer is banished; the only way to destroy it is for its victim to survive.
  • Digiganger. When someone dies near a computer with a monitor that is turned on, some energy moves into the corpse and re-shapes its features to match someone who is in the contacts list of the attached machine. It does not sleep; instead, it goes into a trance with an internet connection and begins shifting biographical information and log-ins to match the new version of the contact victim; the process is slow for the first week, but then picks up speed. Eventually all electronically recorded information (like facial recognition and fingerprints, as well as medical history and so on) will match the digiganger and not the original contact victim. Contact information will adjust to fit the digiganger. As the victim moves to create new online information, the digiganger corrupts it too. To destroy it, investigators must first find out whose corpse it transformed, then delete all of the deceased person’s information on the victim (digital and otherwise.) When that is accomplished, the digiganger energy will leave the corpse, it will rapidly catch up on its decay, and electronic information will immediately revert back to numbers and passwords and so on of the original contact victim.
  • Convictor. This evil spirit merges with a lawyer while the lawyer is dead drunk because of failure in the court room. After that, the lawyer will have blackouts, up to ten minutes a day (and the spirit can save up.) During those blackouts, the convictor (who can see and hear everything the lawyer does, says, and thinks) will make promises, do politics, blackmail, and basically take any needed steps to position a win in the courtroom. Also, the convictor can cut out a living human’s tongue and smear it on a copy of information, then focus on it; the information will change, and so will all copies of it. However, the changes will only last until the now-tongueless victim dies. When the victim dies, the evidence reverts. The convictor uses this power to win victories in court, revealing its actions to its host in dreams and seducing the host with promises of success and power. If the host accepts, the only way to stop the convictor is to kill the host–then all information reverts to normal even though hosts may yet live. The spirit goes and finds another lawyer unless magically contained, or unless the host is killed in the witness stand while testifying. If the host rejects the convictor, then the host may sacrifice his or her tongue to change evidence to deliberately lose a case; this destroys the convictor.
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InSpectres Success

My home game group does not do story games. We play standard RPGs, even if they are almost always ones I made up. However, I wanted to give InSpectres a try. I set it in Grifton, and we played for the first time last night.

The group had hilarious fun! They were part of “Joline’s Wholistic Services.” She had a beauty parlor on the main floor, seances and a business office in the basement, and upstairs space for investigators who look into paranormal phenomenon, mostly part-timers. A police detective had a witness nabbed from a safehouse, and the police were unlikely to find her. Desperate, the detective hired Joline’s Wholistic Services to locate the little girl.

Sure enough, they did. They figured out she was mixed up in something involving fomori and twilight spiders, and they tracked the spiders to their lair in a pump house and repelled them with a spearmint/oil mix, rescuing the little girl (who was infested and hypnotized by the spiders.)

I set up the opening situation, but they did a great job of using narrative to unpack what was really going on as they made up more and more clues to find. A few of the characters suffered terribly over the course of the adventure, but that was fun too. The group quickly warmed to the idea of the “confessional chair.” It was a comedy game, and it was great.

It went so well that the group wants to play this again  next week. So, we’ll have more adventures from Joline’s Wholistic Services.

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“Under the Waterless Sea”

130264I got Zzarchov Kowolski’s scenario, “Under the Waterless Sea,” as part of his buystarter effort. (The idea was, he made a rough version and sold that, using the proceeds to pay for art, maps, and layout; the initial buyers got the updated version.) I think that’s a useful idea, and I wanted to support his effort. Also, the core concept was intriguing, and I wanted a closer look.

I’m going to go into this from three perspectives; a reader, someone planning to run the game, and a play report of how actual play turned out. This review has mild spoilers.

WHAT WAS BEST?

This project has a lot of inspiration stemming from the core idea; a gate you can walk through so it feels like you are above the surface even when you’re walking underwater. Fire burns, no pressure from the deeps, no resistance to movement, none of that for you. Only for those who did not enter through the portal. Also, the portal is shrinking, so there is very little time left to loot and destroy the Deep One city.

Also, the setup is that Lovecraftian Deep Ones were making the standard deal with a Polynesian style settlement, but the local law got involved and flattened the town, and has taken the fight to the underwater city using this magical gate. That’s a fun notion.

The encounters open up many exciting possibilities and have a lot of neat flavor for undersea adventuring.

The treatment of the local economy may be useful beyond this scenario, a piece that could be lifted and used all along an island chain and beyond. An economy of tokens and carved pearls is fun.

 WHAT WAS WORST?

To run this, I had to put in significant effort before starting, and I didn’t get all my prep done. This really hurt how the game unfolded. The kinds of things I had to spend time on were mostly the sort of things I expect the creator to do for me, if I’m going to pay over $9 for a scenario.

NAMES

There are only a very few names provided in the scenario. I went to a baby name generator and selected Polynesian names to fill in the gaps. Players may ask who the king is, who is in charge of the military, the names of the two priests in a power struggle (common knowledge), the name of the settlement, the name of the capitol city, and maybe even a name for the island besides “Old Island.”

There is provision for hiring slingers or pikemen to help out on the expedition, but no names provided to quickly apply to them. The flavor of your Polynesian setting can be dented if they go with “Bob” and “Fisher” and “Big Nose.” I was going to make a list of names myself, and I named the background people of the scenario (like the noble in charge of the military effort to go through the gate) but I ran out of time before I got to the list of names to assign to minor NPCs as need arose. And believe me, need arose. I personally don’t have a lot of Polynesian names at the tip of my tongue.

Also, if players want to make local characters, then you better have some additional prep or go to a web site, because most players aren’t going to have lots of Polynesian names in mind. I don’t know about your players, but mine tend to drag out the naming process, really struggling with picking something, and a list can help.

I do not understand the mind set behind not providing names. If you play with players who don’t care what people are called, then names are easy to ignore. If you don’t like coming up with names, use one or more of the many name generators online for your NPCs, as you are taking your time writing up the scenario. But please don’t expect the person running the game to provide a ceaseless fountain of appropriate names off the cuff, AND remember who got what name as the game unfolds.

MAPS

The maps are keyed in italicized lower case letters. While I would not have expected that to be a problem before I ran the scenario, I found it took me more time to match up the letter entries and the letter locations on the map. Especially since the location descriptions were identified with capitol letters. In the barracks, he runs out of letters, and instead of doubling letters up (AA) he uses an ampersand and dollar sign. I really don’t get the benefit of not just using numbers.

There is no map to show how the different modular areas of the underwater city connect. For example, in the title of the section, the book notes “The Barracks (Links to Labyrinth and to the Spire)” but there’s no clear indication on the map or in the location notes how they fit together.

A whole page is dedicated to showing how everything is laid out (47) but if it is supposed to help, I have no idea how. The picture gives no sense that there are three light zones (shallows, twilight, and deeps.) If the structures in that picture match up with the mapped locations, I can’t tell. Where is the wizard’s dome relative to the temple? Do you have to go through the barracks to reach the spire? What if you try to go around? The DM has to make a map to keep the individual interpretation consistent, or handwave all that away: the maps and art don’t clarify. Also, the picture makes the area look compact, when there are four encounters between the gate and the settlement underwater (so I assume characters have to cover quite a bit of ground.) From the beach to the city looks like a cliff, not like the long winding march to get to the city.

But I have to guess, because there is no indication that I could find how long it would take to manage the hike from the beach to the underwater city, or how far it is. The encounters are diverse enough to assume there are many ways to get there, which suggests more distance and less a single route.

When I was reading the scenario, this wasn’t bad. Reading scenarios is to get inspiration, absorb the flavor, get a sense of how this would work in a game. But preparing to actually run it, or sitting down to actual encounters after reading the scenario (but not making your own aids or interpretations ahead of time) you get pinched in a hurry.

SCORECARD

There is a neat tally for how relatively powerful humans and Deep Ones are when the portal closes; who “wins.” But the way you get those points is scattered through the room key and encounter descriptions, and here and there elsewhere. I would want a big scorecard so I could track what points they got, and what they were worth; trying to track it on the fly out of various descriptions as the game goes on does not take into account the ones you never even see. Great idea, terrible execution. Love the descriptions based on the points, but need some help tracking those points.

OTHER REFLECTIONS

  • RANDOM ENCOUNTERS. The flavor and content of the encounters was excellent. However, they are designed so you generate 3-4 sections of information, some of which having randomizing within them, before you use them. There’s something for the surroundings of the encounter, what is encountered, and something weird that is also going on. I love this and think it is great! But that’s no good for rolling something and describing the outcome while at the game table, in the heat of the action. Too many results for the DM to keep in mind while keeping everything rolling. I adapted by generating a bunch of random encounters for each zone ahead of time, typing them into a point list, ready to check off as we went. That took prep time and effort, absorbing my finite time before running the game so I was not as focused on some of the other elements as I needed to be. It would have been useful to have some pages dedicated to encounters to check off, and the encounter generator behind them so you could make more as you wished.
  • STAT BLOCKS. The OSR stat blocks were so sketchy that they might as well have been omitted. I make a page of things likely to be encountered, and refer to it as I play, rather than needing the stat blocks built into the text. It doesn’t matter that they were there taking up room–until you get in a situation where you’re flipping through multiple pages that all relate to one keyed map. Then the frustration with padding is higher.
  • INTERPRETING THE PORTAL’S BRINY MAGIC. The basics of how the underwater magic works are there, but so many questions arise. I encouraged my players to try experimenting, rather than giving them answers. If they picked up a rock and threw it, the rock answered the laws of air (not water.) If they touched a shark, it continued answering the laws of water. I used an internal guide that living things did not cross back and forth between air law and water law when touched, but small objects did; anything they could lift. I made these rulings on the fly until I saw the internal logic that was driving them in my backbrain, and I could make that explicit. Making these adjustments on the fly, there is great potential to screw up how the whole scenario is going down by establishing precedent you don’t want to live with later. A bit more detail on corner cases would have helped. I feel my interpretations went well and were consistent, and I still had a player who was very frustrated by the whole inconsistency of air and water.
  • DESPAIR. Your mileage may vary. There are several groups trapped underwater in moon pools, the portal magic broken, who are going to die. There isn’t much player characters can do to prevent that. The soldiers know they are going to die, and so do the characters, and that can make for some pretty wrenching moments. Maybe your players don’t give a damn about that, but if they might, it’s worth considering whether you want to provide a way for players to bring them real assistance (via spell or magical item) to help them escape, or if you’re cool with the pathos.
  • CHAOS. My players expected a surface siege of the underwater city to have picket lines, reserve forces, siege equipment maybe, certainly people in charge down there with significant military numbers. I riffed off the setting and explained that there were morale problems because of the mental strain of reconciling the portal magic, so after the big push the injured military commander was jealously protecting the portal. Those who had the physical and mental toughness to go down and “fire at will” hunting down survivors were allowed to do so, their payment in loot. Still, the players felt that was a sketchy setup. If you are going to have an undersea siege, you’ll have to map it out and assign forces and figure out the commander’s strategy, none of that is in the scenario as it stands.
  • REFUGEE SUBPLOT. There is a refugee subplot going on in the scenario. The names are missing, the meat of the refugee issue must be pieced together, and it wasn’t worth my bother. If you want to go with it, then that’s cool, you can piece it together on your own. I’m just mentioning it was there, but too murky and I didn’t have enough time to clarify it before game time, so I dropped it.
  • STARGATE. One of the most important rooms in the scenario has five gates, one of which is hidden, that go to other Deep One settlements. This is cumbersome if you do not want to open up access to have your adventurers leaping into other oceans with minimal warning or prep. Instead I reduced it to a single portal that was a stargate, with dialing in coordinates to figure out where the other end opens. Turns out they didn’t make it far enough to find that, but I did not want to have to improvise so much so fast when it comes to multiple active magical gates.

My players were first level (the scenario has no indication what level characters it recommends) and they signed on with some military guys who were blowing off steam after a rough day. They heard some guys were stranded in the tower, and that it was ‘fire at will’ seek and destroy and loot time. The next morning they went down through the portal. They fended off a shark in a field of jellyfish, and got nearly killed by a couple crabs. Once they reached the city, they went through the wizard’s dome. They looted it some, and found the pathetic trapped man; the slingers put him out of his misery after the characters left the room, shaken. They killed some undead and retreated, through the residential labyrinth, over the barracks (and had a fracas with some Deep Ones, one of which rode a shark; they won decisively through superior ranged attacks). They climbed up and got some supplies to the plucky tower defenders, then pulled back and left. On the way out they ducked a giant shark, and had some other minor mishaps.

They were unanimous that they had no further interest in this island or its magical portal, so what could have been a number of targeted missions ended up being a one-shot. If asked whether they enjoyed it overall, I think the typical response would be a frown, and a grudging “I guess so.”

I have not yet mentioned the penis tower. The Deep One citadel looks just like a penis, it was built that way intentionally. I pointed out the culture’s obsession with virility, but the tower does put a dent in any effort to take the scenario seriously. There is very little art in the scenario, but somehow there are two pictures of the penis tower in addition to a vertical map of it.

Furthermore, there are a number of Spongebob Squarepants nods through the scenario that are a bit jarring when contrasted with some of the truly awful stuff going on. (The font on the cover, fire underwater, fields of jellyfish.) So, your mileage with those elements may vary too.

In case you are interested, here is the reference document I hastily threw together to run this scenario in Crumbling Epoch. The first half page is very useful, the second half page is how I thought they’d come in (but instead they all made new characters.) Then a page of encounters, and finally a page of monster stats and a stab at the city layout. (I was in a desperate rush by then.) Under the Waterless Sea Reference

In conclusion, I think this was an interesting effort with some really great things in it, but it was badly hampered by a few design decisions. Fun to read, lots and lots of work to prepare for use at the game table, and frustrating to run as written.

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Knockout

I want more stealth and knockouts in my games.

I like Odysseus better than Achilles. Tricksters, spies, and con men are far more interesting than thugs, assassins, and warlords. Of course, what I like even better is when you can mix them together for characters who can choose a path. Slip through quietly if you can, it gets bloody if you are caught; or, go in hard but if you can’t get through, revert to stealth or guile.

I am still working through a stealth/surprise/detection system I like, but in the meantime, I have decided I want to have better knockout mechanics.

My first thought was how to handle it for people, but as I thought further, I realized that this could be a key to adding more flavor to monsters and using statistics and rules to reshape how players think about their environment and their options.

Here is the basic: if you attack as though casting a spell (declare in the beginning of the round and go last) and inflict 3 points per hit die in a single attack of the appropriate kind, the target is knocked out. You can move up to 1/2 your normal move and do this, allowing attack in ambush and from surprise for a knockout. (Combat experts could drop that to 2 hit points per hit die.)

Next is defining the “appropriate kind.” For humans and humanoids, that would entail a blunt attack or a choking grapple attack. The difference is blunt attack would get a weapon bonus for the hit points, and a grapple attack would just be combat bonus and stance advantage. Poison attacks could count as the appropriate kind and roll “damage” to try and overcome the threshold. An enchanted sap could reduce the threshold by 1 per hit die. A sleep spell could be a magical assault generating points to be applied against the threshold.

Where this becomes interesting to me is when the DM acknowledges “appropriate kind” for monsters! Here you could have tuning attacks on crystalline creatures, water “attacks” for earthen or fire creatures, silver “attacks” to kill werewolves outright based on this mechanic, and so on. What if you had to address the question of what was an “appropriate kind” of attack to KO your monster when you were making it?

This is not written in stone, but it is an idea that is getting traction in my mind. I like the idea of adventurers loading up on equipment to “knock out” defenses in a setting, and having tools and inclination to render foes unconscious instead of killing everyone who gets in the way.

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Secret Santicore Needs Print on Demand!

We have two years’ worth of Secret Santicore with finished .pdfs. I am asking for a volunteer who would be willing to make a POD version available at cost.

http://gibletblizzard.blogspot.co.nz/2011/12/secret-santicore-2011.html

(There is a big cover illustration, repeated below, that may help.)

http://metalvsskin.blogspot.com/2014/03/secret-santicore-2013-volume-3-pdf.html

(This page has a link to volumes 1-3 and a cover by Scrap Princess.)

The Santicore team is getting together for the 2013 version. The leaders have explicitly said that they have no plans to make a POD for 2013 and they will not ask any of their volunteers to work on that. So, it looks like outside help would be welcome for that too.

First let’s get the last two years out where we can thumb through them, leave junk mail envelopes for bookmarks, and show stuff to friends at the table! =)

Is anyone interested in helping out?

EDIT: DYSON LOGOS IS DOING 2013! AWESOME!

ss_2011_cover

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InSpectres Support Material

I got InSpectres, a game by Jared A. Sorenson. I’ve been spending time with it, trying to understand how it works. Here is a sample of play I generated; it covers character generation, franchise generation, and the first two missions.

InSpectres Sample Game

I also created a character sheet and a franchise sheet that fit my own aesthetic and play style better.

InSpectre Sheet

InSpectre Franchise Sheet

GM Reference, InSpectres

On the GM reference, I included house rules for advancing the characters (in a way that I feel honors the spirit and flat advancement rate of the game.) The other house rule is to take money from the franchise between big jobs, unless the franchise invests a lot of money so they can run off the interest.

This is all preparatory to me making a more effective Cthulhu Mythos hack. I’ve made great progress on it, and I will share it when it is finished.

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Some thoughts.

Storium: I am down to playing in two games. I’m in the wrap-up phase of running one game, then I will only be running one game. That’s a serious reduction, and I’m happier with the lower profile.

Domains At War: I got the books! They are pretty, they are well done, and they are smart. However, I will never endure all the math of actually playing the system in them. I want someone to make this conscientious work into a video game so I can shove all that math under the hood and just play the game. Seriously, it is great and I am glad it exists! But I’m not going to put that much work into having my fun.

InSpectres: Damn those game bundles and all their tempting goods! But I got to take a look at InSpectres, which is a delightful game I would like to try out. Maybe I’ll find a way to do it. At the height of lameness, the InSpectres web site no longer exists; however, a helpful netizen pointed me here, where you can still get all the supplemental stuff. And guess what! I’ll be making some of my own! Seriously though, for the exorbitant rate they charge for the tiny .pdf, they could have some non-pixellated art in there. The character sheets can’t be printed and used, and most of the art is blurry and wrecked. At that price point, there is no DIY forgiveness. None. Still, looks like a fun game!

Friday Tragedy: It is a busy time of year. All but four players bowed out of my “Lasers and Feelings” test tonight. Of the four, one was up late with toddlers who have been crazy all week, and is in no condition to play. The others all have various other pressures, and I’m weary to the bone. So it made sense to call it this week. No test of Lasers and Feelings.

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